The support in there is really hit and miss, which can be a bummer, as the quality of response you receive can vary greatly depending upon who replies, and it’s seldom you’ll get much from either of the head muckity mucks. They profess to be active in the community chat, but often times it’s a lot of “hey, great job…keep up the good work and you’ll be making money in no time” kind of fluff. Be prepared to do some Googling when you have a question.
The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature. 

I joined WA and it was really helpful in the beginning because I was new to Affiliate Marketing. I haven’t given up on affiliate marketing, and I am currently learning how to piece together my own resources that seem more up to date. This has given me piece of mind and I feel this will provide more stability. I do see a lot of people promoting WA by comparing them to other similar programs. Craig’s review is very refreshing and spot on. Thank you Craig.
While these models have diminished in mature e-commerce and online advertising markets they are still prevalent in some more nascent industries. China is one example where Affiliate Marketing does not overtly resemble the same model in the West. With many affiliates being paid a flat "Cost Per Day" with some networks offering Cost Per Click or CPM.
LinkConnector has struggled to stand out from the pack but nonetheless has managed to sign some exclusive deals with big name brands, including Writer’s Digest, the Disney Store, Ironman, Hats.com, and Everly. Their strictly controlled screening process for both merchants/advertisers and affiliates/publishers means that you can always rely on the quality of products on offer.
Retain some control. If you upload photos of yourself, or friends/family with consent, it's worth going for the 'rights managed' licence option – otherwise you'll have little to no control over how your images are used (eg, you could star in an ad for haemorrhoid cream). See Alamy's page on understanding stock image licensing for more on the different types of licences.
Starting a podcast, like making a YouTube channel or blog, comes down to telling interesting stories and building an engaged audience. I’m probably sounding like a broken record by now, but you need a niche that you’re interested in and there’s already a demand for. Come up with a list of topics you’d like to talk about and then search iTunes charts, Google Trends and other podcast research sites like cast.market to see what’s currently out there and popular.
This is a tough one to answer. On one hand, yes, they do provide some adequate training in the way of affiliate marketing and WordPress site management, but it’s a little self-serving. They really tout their platform as a magic bullet solution for IM, but it’s not. They’re also quick to suggest WA as a good affiliate marketing niche, but that is a definite NO.
Offer to watch children or pets. If you know anyone who has children or pets, you could easily begin a side gig as a babysitter or pet sitter. To let people know you’re interested, send out a group email describing your services, post an ad on Facebook, or tell friends and acquaintances about your availability in person or over the phone. You can also create a profile on a babysitting referral site like Care.com.

While these models have diminished in mature e-commerce and online advertising markets they are still prevalent in some more nascent industries. China is one example where Affiliate Marketing does not overtly resemble the same model in the West. With many affiliates being paid a flat "Cost Per Day" with some networks offering Cost Per Click or CPM.
This review is right on the money. I know exactly what Craig is saying here because I’ve been in the online space for quite some time now ;). The information in WA is not incorrect, but as Craig said, the process is grossly oversimplified. This is probably intended to draw in newbies more easily. Look at it like this, each of those main steps probably have like 50-100 substeps, if not more, lol. You have to be disciplined, learn and absorb all the theory and apply it, but folks suffer too much from Get Rich Quick mentality and impatience online. Think about it, if it takes REAL work to build a regular bricks and mortar business, what makes you think it won’t take you work to build a business that just simply happens to based online? It is still all within the realm of this universe, law, and universal laws hold haha. Anyway, not meaning to be facetious. All else being equal, the best thing about an business that happens to be based online is the ability it has to SCALE! That’s where the real advantages come in IMHO. Best of luck to you all 
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