The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.
2018 TL;DR Update: DO NOT promote Wealthy Affiliate. Sign up for a free trial, engage with the community and learn what you can before your access expires, but DO NOT GO PREMIUM. They are selling a fantasy built on a dying business model which serves only to benefit (no surprise here…) the founders of Wealthy Affiliate. You can glean some value from the trial, but do not invest in their training and by all means do not even consider building out any sites using their proprietary services. If you want to know why, then read on…
The lessons can be useful to those just starting out, but I think that their service attracts a lot of misled buyers because of how easy they make it all seem. Sure, you could make some money in affiliate marketing if you follow their training and tutorials and put in an ungodly amount of work. I’m sure of this, but . . . most people who arrive at Wealthy Affiliate will be lucky if they make enough money to pay for their membership.
Tom, I think they’re business model is based upon luring in the non-internet-savvy desperate unemployed worker and the retiree. It is a shame that they’ve been able to continue extorting money from folks, but in time they’re pump and dump scheme will eventually be exhausted. More social proof of their racket will emerge on blogs and social media, and they’re ownership over the search results for ‘wealthy affiliate review’, ‘wealthy affiliate scam’, etc, etc…will begin to slip. As Google and search continues to mature and evolve, their dying business model will continue to erode.
Now may I know if you ever heard about shopmozo.co I’m a member of this new-launched e-commerce site (but didn’t purchase the referral rights). They offer one-time membership but with too much upselling. It seems promising though and I want to recommend it to friends but I am thinking twice if it is worth it. Also because all the reviews I read about it are from affiliates.
If you have a business, you want to get listed on Yelp! You may not use the software, but some people do, and they use it religiously (and I don’t mean they’ll kill you over it). By listing your business on Yelp!, you’re putting yourself on the map. From here, you also need to start using Yelp! Write reviews of places you go. It’ll be worth it in the long run.
The ONLY way you will make money is by creating a 'practice' blog page (which becomes your sole purpose) that markets your affiliation with Wealthy Affiliates! In fact, so MANY pages have been created for this purpose that their SEO is AMAZING! It's genius really! They made it so that even if you look up complaints you will be hard pressed to find me, and instead only sites that are cronies just promoting themselves. It's the worst case of writing reviews for yourself that I've ever seen. 
As someone who has years of experience doing lead generation on a local blog. Getting enough “traffic” for an affiliate site is damn hard. Over the past couple of years, an injury to my foot has left me slightly disabled. Affiliate marketing makes sense for someone like me with prior blogging experience who now has limitations. I will start with one niche and add another site later. I’m hoping to see good results in within about 18 months. But that’s only because I know how to do a lot of things and I know what’s involved. You have to write consistently, work your SEO, pick your poison in social media and be engaged in it. It’s a lot of hard WORK. I feel sorry for anyone who got their site shut down because they didn’t know how to transfer their site to another host. That’s terrible.
×