But don't make the mistake of thinking this will be a passive source of income—you're on call whenever you have a guest and you'll always need to keep the place clean for incoming visitors. On top of just renting on Airbnb, consider offering your guests paid add-ons, like Lauren Gheysens', Royal Day Out in London, England—where she gives visitors a local's only tour of the city, complete with bespoke 18th century costumes.
That being said, LinkConnector’s platform looks and feels outdated and is rather clumsily designed. Their dashboard also makes it difficult to find “hot” products or compare conversion rates, leaving affiliates somewhat in the dark about which products to choose. Ironically, despite their low-quality website, they offer some of the best customer service in the affiliate space.
Good to hear. I started on WA free account and was thinking about the premium but it is so hard to get an honest review in IM that it takes a lot of time to read as much as you can on a course before pulling the trigger on one. Im thinking maybe a mentor would be good. Do you know of any programs like this ? I think talking to someones would be the best way to learn. Hope to read your new topic on IM. thanks
So an effective affiliate marketing program requires some forethought. The terms and conditions have to be tight, especially if the contract agreement is to pay for traffic rather than sales. The potential for fraud in affiliate marketing is a possibility. Unscrupulous affiliates can squat on domain names with misspellings and get a commission for the redirect; they can populate online registration forms with fake or stolen information; they can purchase adwords on search terms the company already ranks high on, and so on. Even if the terms and conditions are clear, an affiliate marketing program requires that someone be monitoring affiliates and enforcing the rules. In exchange for that effort, however, a company can access motivated, creative people to help sell their product or services to the world.
LinkConnector has struggled to stand out from the pack but nonetheless has managed to sign some exclusive deals with big name brands, including Writer’s Digest, the Disney Store, Ironman, Hats.com, and Everly. Their strictly controlled screening process for both merchants/advertisers and affiliates/publishers means that you can always rely on the quality of products on offer.
Many make claims to “keep digging”, your just a few blocks away and crap, and it’s enticing to see, but these days I steer away from the catchy dashboard headlines and money making attention articles that people post about. Not a minute after you mentioned Launch Jacking I had to look into it, and I read Jeff Lenney’s article. I actually can pin point a couple people who I can see doing this, and they are not the ones who have even tried out the product for themselves, or likely have an honest review, it’s just for the cash.

Research selling prices of items similar to yours. Look up completed sales or current listings of items similar to yours. Find the high- and low-end prices, and price your object around the median price level. If you want your item to sell quickly, price it at the low end. The condition of the item also affects the price. Items in poorer condition should be priced at the lower end. Also, consider how many listings there already are of items similar to yours. If many similar items will be competing with yours, you may have to set the price lower to get the sale.[28]


Today, if you're at all serious about succeeding in any endeavor, whether online or offline, you have to deliver enormous amounts of value. Yes, you have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. This is especially true online. Why? Because it takes time to build authority and create an audience, two primary ingredients necessary to succeed in the wonderful world of commerce on the web.


As someone who has years of experience doing lead generation on a local blog. Getting enough “traffic” for an affiliate site is damn hard. Over the past couple of years, an injury to my foot has left me slightly disabled. Affiliate marketing makes sense for someone like me with prior blogging experience who now has limitations. I will start with one niche and add another site later. I’m hoping to see good results in within about 18 months. But that’s only because I know how to do a lot of things and I know what’s involved. You have to write consistently, work your SEO, pick your poison in social media and be engaged in it. It’s a lot of hard WORK. I feel sorry for anyone who got their site shut down because they didn’t know how to transfer their site to another host. That’s terrible.
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