Test websites. Remote usability testing means getting paid to navigate a website for the first time and giving feedback to the website owner. Most tests take approximately 15 minutes, and you can get paid up to $10 for each test. A test involves performing a scenario on the client’s website and recording yourself doing it. For example, you might be asked to go through the process of selecting and purchasing an item on a retailer’s website.[1]


2. People Buy More than One Item – the great thing about Amazon is that you don’t just earn a commission on the product that you send people to, but anything that they buy once they’re at Amazon. You earn a commission on anything a person buys within 24 hours of you sending them to Amazon. One out of every four shoppers buys more than one item per session.

Tutor students. Many families prefer the flexibility of using an online tutor. Depending on your background, you could be simply helping a child with homework or providing college-level support. You need to have your own computer and high speed internet. Experience required differs among companies. Some require “strong experience,” while others require a specific educational background. However, most companies do require a college degree.
Most of the useful teachings for affiliates are lessons you need to uncover through diligent search, trial, error and first-hand experience. A few of the resources I leveraged the most were Warrior Forum and the EPN community. There were a few blogs I used to follow as well, but most of what I found that worked was by way of focusing on building great sites, not on ‘how to make money’.
One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.

I only ever used Wayback Machine to download and copy odd files and photos that I no longer have. I’m not sure if you can copy/download the whole site but maybe possible with something like HTTrack. In any case, I think you would be better off just saving the stuff that you no longer have and build an updated version of the site on a new server. It shouldn’t take long unless you have hundreds of pages.


Yep, I agree with what Anusuya Choudhury said. Many people are looking for easy $$$$ and fall for the promise to make lots of money. But can you blame WA for that? They explicitly tell everywhere in the training that you have to work hard to achieve any success. The sky is a limit. And that limit is you. So, you don’t have to give a negative review just because someone did not hand you everything on the plate without hard work. You can’t just be so negative because your level of expertise is high and WA couldn’t give you what you were looking for. Support is amazing there. Not everyone is a tech like you. But they can start and learn from 0 on WA platform. Writers, cooks, motivational speakers – they all can surpass you and generate tones of money just following their passion. You are affiliate yourself. So, it doesn’t matter where you get your knowledge as long as it works for you.
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