As a current member of WA I can attest to everything that TeamAMR has outlined here.  I was skeptical at first, even when I first signed up, I did not engage but instead I was taking my time poking, sniffing around.  Once I started reading the blogs, the comments I decided to take the plunge and begin the training.  Now I’m a WA junkie, every time I see a member post a success story, I become more committed to my goal and work even harder.  If you are skeptical, it surely is understandable but sign up and snoop around like I first did and don’t be afraid and you will soon see that WA is legitimate and genuine.
Udemy.com – Udemy is an online training platform where “instructors” can create courses and sell them to “students”. There are some extremely high-quality courses on Udemy created by high-quality instructors who really have made a lot of money online, but there are a lot of very low-quality courses as well. Most of the higher quality courses are quite expensive, sometimes exceeding $100. While the training might be good, the training on Wealthy Affiliate is excellent as well, plus you get all the tools, community, and support included as well. Once again, I believe Wealthy Affiliate is the better option.
With Wealthy Affiliate, you have community support available to you 24/7. In the time of instant gratification, members also love the Live Chat, which gives you access to a platform where you can ask questions and get answers immediately. There is also instant search option that enables you to search any desired topic, and information will be retrieved from various areas of training, discussions boards, blogs, video materials and more.
Sell plasma. After passing an initial screening, you can usually sell your plasma for anywhere from $25 to $50 per donation. To qualify, you’ll have to stand in a long line or show up early, be willing to fill out a very personal questionnaire, and endure a painful needle prick or two. Still, selling plasma is a great way to raise money fast – if you can stand the hassle.
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
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