Blogging is something that requires patience, persistence and discipline. It may mean writing everyday for over a year before you really start to see any money from it. There are exceptions to the rule, but from my dealings with other bloggers, it seems to be pretty common to spend one or even two years building your blog, your brand and your authority, before making any serious amount of money.
After trying many programs and being scammed, I gave Wealthy Affiliate a shot. I was at my wits end with all the other things that I have tried. It was a bit of a reprieve when I realized that the people behind Wealthy Affiliate are really there to help you and are actually front and center within their business. I asked Kyle who is one of the owners a question about my website the other day and I got a detailed response in less than an hour.
2018 TL;DR Update: DO NOT promote Wealthy Affiliate. Sign up for a free trial, engage with the community and learn what you can before your access expires, but DO NOT GO PREMIUM. They are selling a fantasy built on a dying business model which serves only to benefit (no surprise here…) the founders of Wealthy Affiliate. You can glean some value from the trial, but do not invest in their training and by all means do not even consider building out any sites using their proprietary services. If you want to know why, then read on…
Become a freelance writer or editor. If you have a passion for storytelling or a background in writing or editing, it’s possible to find freelance writing or editing work online. To search available job openings, check out sites like UpWork.com and Problogger.net. You can also check traditional job sites such as Indeed.com and enter “telecommute” or “anywhere” in the location field.
No offense, but isn’t making money via Wealthy Affiliate commission through giving them a good review to prompt others to join essentially a pyramid scheme? Seems like you are luring people with the promise of the “easy money” on the internet that is actually a lot harder to obtain, by using earning you made from Wealthy Affiliate by convincing others to join in terms first place.

You also should not join Wealthy Affiliate if you don’t enjoy the community / social aspect of it. A huge part of Wealthy Affiliate is the ability to communicate with other members. It’s a “help and be helped” community. If you have no interest in setting up your profile, asking questions, supporting others, chatting in the live chat sessions, or doing any sort of participation, you will not get the full benefit of the service.
Hi Craig – Correct me if I am wrong, but your information about not being able to access your website after going Premium is also misleading. Your domain name is your own and you can move it to any other hosting company. When you quit your hosting from any company — including Wealthy Affiliate — of course you can no longer access your site from there. You make it sound like your site is “lost” or somehow WA makes it “disappear” when in fact all you need to do is pay someone else to host it and move your domain. You will pay for hosting no matter what, it is often $25+ per month for not even as many features as are offered by Wealthy Affiliate. This means that for an additional $25 you can access on-going training on SEO updates, social media, and other necessary services. This seems like a deal to me. Yes, Wealthy Affiliate makes it sound easier than it is to get to the money, but I would rather that people figure out that they are not willing to do the work for a $49 loss than for a $300-$1000+ loss as is the cost of other programs.
Promoting WA is a tired and oversaturated niche. They have funneled users into this niche to further their own SEO and to turn their customers into their marketing team, but I believe WA’s best days are far behind them. The lessons they provide are alright, but the tools they give you to work with are pretty bad. For example, there is no way you can use their hosting platform and WordPress installer to set up a successful site. There may be sites which are doing well on their platform, but they were built 6-8 years ago and are well indexed by now. Removing this from the equation significantly lessens the value of their membership.
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