Hi, I think this is the most comprehensive review of Wealthy Affiliate which I have seen, and I have seen many because I am a WA member. There is nothing I could add to this review except to conform what you are writing here. I started here and built 2 sites. The lessons and support from the community are as you describe, I could not manage anything without the support. Only one remark about ambassadors, they get nothing. I am one of them so I should know, right?
Thanks for the reply, but you didn’t really deny my statement that being an affiliate for Wealthy Affiliate is essentially being part of a pyramid scheme. My review was mostly negative though, so I’m not really an affiliate. But why is it that you barely mentioned how you have to struggle to make money via commissions in Wealthy Affiliate? Or how most of the program consists of writing content? Could’ve mentioned how this program is not for people not really interested in writing because you have to be interested and love what you do in order to be committed. You only mentioned that this is not a get rich quick scheme like once, which is cliche nowadays because of that Tai Lopez guy, so people may think that only time is needed, but making money will be a piece of cake. False reassurance essentially. Meanwhile, most members are struggling to make a commission based on the blogs I read. That’s why I will just focus on product reviews and not stress out about writing articles. Lastly, I feel like showing your earnings is not exactly proof, but rather motivation for them to join as they feel like they can make that too, but that only means you keep receiving the earnings to get new people in the future to pay for membership and repeat the cycle.
Yeah except I would be telling the truth! They are really nice and good about responding as long as their hand is in your bank account. I have sent 8 emails over the last few weeks and no response. I work 14 hour days and if I had known they would pull this I would have taken time off to get the site moved- I went through the training there but I couldn’t get past the idea of posting reviews for products I have never tried. It seems like that is their method and I personally find it despicable. They clearly are not an honest company. I found most of the education there to be really basic and the live chat is basically just the blind leading the blind. There seems to be a quiet desperation among many the members. It is clear not many are making decent money but are afraid to complain for fear of being banished. Anyone that wants the straight scoop on this company should go look at the ripoff reports. They just lost a big lawsuit for their fraudulent practices and it may well put them and all the affilliates that posted fraudulent reviews out of business. Apparently the judge in the case is pretty disgusted with them and they are saying he may order all the fake reviews be removed on top of paying damages to the companies whose reputation they have harmed so there goes their marketing plan. What they did to me was reprehensible. I was a member for over 2 years and they got $600 out of me. What a waste of money! Telling me I would have 30 days to move the site and then blocking my permissions so I cannot is fraud. I plan to spread the word. You better believe this will be the most expensive $50 they ever stole. 

Amazon customers are loyal. Beyond that, Amazon customers--especially Amazon Prime members--are more than happy to convert. According to a 2015 report, Prime members are said to convert at a rate 22 times greater than customers that shop with other top online retailers. So, if you can tap into that audience and appeal to their willingness to spend money with Amazon, you should see a good return on your decision to join the program.
This is a tough one to answer. On one hand, yes, they do provide some adequate training in the way of affiliate marketing and WordPress site management, but it’s a little self-serving. They really tout their platform as a magic bullet solution for IM, but it’s not. They’re also quick to suggest WA as a good affiliate marketing niche, but that is a definite NO.
I’m sure there are people making lots of money from affiliate marketing, but these probably tend to be people doing launch jacking. If you have no conscience and you want to earn lots of money, go for it. I’m sure it’s not actually that difficult to learn. Jeff Lenney has a blog post all about it. By the way, he’s the guy who got taken to court by WA for daring to write a negative review [Craig, feel free to remove that bit if you want].
2. As an affiliate marketer, there are 100’s of millions of products and services you can promote in exchange for a commission. You sign up for what are called “affiliate programs” and once you do that, you are given special links for that company that are unique to you. When you send people to one of those links (through your website, social media, email, or otherwise) and they buy something, you get a % commission. For example, if you sign up to Amazons affiliate program, you can promote any product on their website and earn 6% commissions. Commissions range from 5-75% typically, depending on the program.
Sell stuff online. If you have high-quality items to sell, there are a slew of online marketplaces you can use. Just make sure you understand the fees associated with your sale before you take the plunge. Where neighborhood Facebook pages and Craigslist ads are free, many online marketplaces or consignment shops charge for ads or require you to fork over a percentage when you make a sale.
In the Institute's submissions on the foreign affiliate reporting rules, we have emphasized three broad taxpayer goals for the legislation: The rules must be administrable; they should avoid imposing substantial new reporting burdens where the information is generally available on audit; and finally, appropriate relief provisions are necessary because no matter how fair and well-crafted the rules, unique facts and circumstances exist (or will arise) that will preclude some taxpayers from fully complying with the requirements.
Host a yard sale to get rid of things you don’t want anymore. Clean out your room and gather up all of the toys, decor, and clothes that you no longer use or want. Display your items on a folding table in your yard or driveway with your parents' permission. Put prices on each piece with a sticker label based on what you think it’s worth and the original price of the item.[4]
Here are some additional pictures from the conference. This first picture is from the Wynn Hotel. Kyle and Carson, the owners of Wealthy Affiliate, rented out an incredible 2 story suite for us to party in. They had top shelf drinks, entertainment, mouth-watering food, and we were simply treated like ballers. Networking and making connections with these other successful affiliate marketers was invaluable.

For starters they make no promises that what you will learn will be able to work on a regular site. The premise behind what they do is based on how blog-style sites work and generate traffic. Yes they do this in a completely different method. You can get traffic easier in a blog than with your web site. But since you "know what you are doing" already, you must have known that. 


This is like a free graduate level college course every month available just for the reading. And unlike most college professors, these guys and gals are actually earning in the real world. Michelle made well over a million USD last year from mainly affiliate programs,AFTER she paid her running expenses and US taxes. She sure didn't do it by reviewing bicycle pedals 😉
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