First and foremost, I found this while doing research on these on line work from home business. I am just kind of put off with your review because honestly they way you described your actions and attitude to the company in general, I would have reacted in much the same way but I would not have been as nice about it. Let's face it....you were rude. You know what they say, "you get what you give. I don't think anyone out there who has out the time and effort into creating such a training program would be okay with any one skipping ahead to what they think they need. You came off like a know it all and nobody likes that. So in my opinion, you tried something, it didn't work so, you didn't get your way and so basically this is your rendition of throwing a tantrum...grow up!!!!
Recycle items at the local recycling center if they accept collections. Many recycling sites will pay a small fee per pound of recyclable items. Go around your neighborhood collecting things like glass bottles, soda cans, newspapers, cereal boxes, and milk jugs. Have your parents drive you to the nearest recycling center and turn in your haul in exchange for money.[17]
I achieved what I set out to do and found out that Wealthy Affiliate have not published any cancellation policy other than a couple of lines in the “terms and conditions” A bit poor if you ask me, I would have thought it was a legal requirement with such a company. Additionally there is no refund policy as far as I know either. I’m sure they haven’t overlooked this due to their past experiences with the legal system.
“A pyramid scheme (commonly known as pyramid scams) is a business model that recruits members via a promise of payments or services for enrolling others into the scheme, rather than supplying investments or sale of products or services. As recruiting multiplies, recruiting becomes quickly impossible, and most members are unable to profit; as such, pyramid schemes are unsustainable and often illegal.”
Suppose you’re running a gadget blog and you’re delighted with your new Kindle Fire. So you write a post describing the new features and how you find it even more useful than your old Kindle. In the course of your post you add a text link to the product page on Amazon.com. You might mention that other users love it too, judging from the overwhelmingly positive user reviews, and maybe mention something about the range of Kindle Fire accessories that are available.

I finally decide to go premium with WA earlier this year and even though I’ve just now chosen a niche, I can officially say that through all of the ups and downs, everyone in the community has been super supportive and so encouraging. Another thing I love about WA is that no matter where I am in my blogging journey, I can always count on an answer from the community or I can always go back and refresh my memory with the training that’s provided. I’m looking forward to seeing how far I can go and I love that I have so much time to work on my site now, since I’ve cut my hours at work and already purchased the yearly membership.

There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
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