One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.
One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.
Paint friends’ nails for a small fee if you have a steady hand. All you need are a few pretty polishes and a little creativity to start your own pop-up nail studio. Charge extra for fancy designs, glitter, or stick-on jewels. Offer a discount if they get a manicure and a pedicure. For example, if a manicure is $5 and a pedicure is $6, make a mani-pedi $10 for a $1 savings to encourage people to spend more.
Yeah except I would be telling the truth! They are really nice and good about responding as long as their hand is in your bank account. I have sent 8 emails over the last few weeks and no response. I work 14 hour days and if I had known they would pull this I would have taken time off to get the site moved- I went through the training there but I couldn’t get past the idea of posting reviews for products I have never tried. It seems like that is their method and I personally find it despicable. They clearly are not an honest company. I found most of the education there to be really basic and the live chat is basically just the blind leading the blind. There seems to be a quiet desperation among many the members. It is clear not many are making decent money but are afraid to complain for fear of being banished. Anyone that wants the straight scoop on this company should go look at the ripoff reports. They just lost a big lawsuit for their fraudulent practices and it may well put them and all the affilliates that posted fraudulent reviews out of business. Apparently the judge in the case is pretty disgusted with them and they are saying he may order all the fake reviews be removed on top of paying damages to the companies whose reputation they have harmed so there goes their marketing plan. What they did to me was reprehensible. I was a member for over 2 years and they got $600 out of me. What a waste of money! Telling me I would have 30 days to move the site and then blocking my permissions so I cannot is fraud. I plan to spread the word. You better believe this will be the most expensive $50 they ever stole.
28. Subscription – If you think of something valuable (newsletter, online magazine, etc.) that you can consistently offer on a certain basis (weekly, monthly, etc.), you may want to offer a subscription service. This could be a fee charged each time your product is sent out or on a monthly basis. Either way, this has to be something that your customers can only get by subscribing to your website.
Most of the useful teachings for affiliates are lessons you need to uncover through diligent search, trial, error and first-hand experience. A few of the resources I leveraged the most were Warrior Forum and the EPN community. There were a few blogs I used to follow as well, but most of what I found that worked was by way of focusing on building great sites, not on ‘how to make money’.
I was a member of Wealthy Affiliate for 2.5 years. I made a little bit of money through my own niches, but nowhere near enough to justify the work I put into it. I did the bootcamp course and made some money referring other people to WA, but I did so mainly by churning out fake negative reviews of competing products, which is the direction that the bootcamp course leads you in. The whole setup of the bootcamp course is bullshit. It teaches clueless newbies to shout out to the world that WA is the best way to make money online, all before they even know whether this is true or not.
I wish I would have read this post before I became a premium member at WA in June 2017. I tried it out for a month but suddenly realized I was doing more to promote WA then I was working on my blogs. I didn’t realize that if you bowed out of premium that basically you could never log back into your WA profile unless you became premium again for life. I couldn’t see paying $49 a month for building blogs where I wouldn’t see any income or very little for quite some time so after one month, I decided to jump ship. My stomach turned afterwards when I realized that I cannot get back to my profile. To this day, I still have people following me on WA and little do they realize that I cannot respond to anything because the owners won’t let me back in.
Hunt for under-priced used books that you can sell online. Download an app that reads ISBN numbers so you can scan the barcodes on books. This will pull up the book’s current price on Amazon so you can see if it’s worth trying to resell it. Then, visit used book stores, thrift stores, and garage sales to look for high value books. Post the books for sale online using sites like Amazon or Ebay.[9]
I don’t think that WA should promote the training platform by stating that one can have their business up and running in 3 minutes. However, I recognize that is a marketing ploy. I consistently tell my readers that affiliate marketing is NOT easy and requires a lot of motivation, determination and patience because earning substantial passive income will not happen over night.
When I enrolled in WA, I almost immediately had misgivings, which I ignored at first, about two things: 1) using their platform to build sites, as you mentioned, and 2) the bootcamp, which had too much of a circular flavor for my taste – and for my trust. I was actually surprised that so many people would promote WA instead of developing a personal niche. Looking backwards, bootcamp sites are easy to spot: they all have a link at the top called “My #1 Recommendation” or something similar. So much for originality.
You should also make sure you aren't competing with your own affiliates for eyeballs. Any marketing channels you're using, such as search engines, content sites or e-mail lists, should be off limits to your affiliates. Put marketing restrictions into your affiliate agreement and notify partners immediately. It's your program--you set the rules. Or, if you prefer, you can let your affiliates run the majority of your internet marketing.

I only ask you this because you made the above comment “there is no way you can use their hosting platform and WordPress installer to set up a successful site. There may be sites which are doing well on their platform, but they were built 6-8 years ago and are well indexed by now. Removing this from the equation significantly lessens the value of their membership.”
This may sound to good to be true? It’s not. From my own experience I can confirm 100% of what you said. Sure, the work is on you and nobody will do that for you. But you can be sure to get the best training, support, community – you name it, to start out in affiliate marketing. WA not only makes no up-sell, they actually provide a down-sell with their 1-year membership which comes for a special price. 
I have joined WA last week (premium) but yes in a few days i can agree with you totally. The hosting is pointless as its so limited, can’t use many wordpress essential plugins as they claim it affects there hosting! Also i like to tinker and geek out, and when you have no access to your own CPanel or database etc it’s so restrictive. Also i dont trust WA with my sites, however much i put into them, they are not mine. They are sat on WA, so yes im still using my own hosting package.
Hi Amol, You can’t really expect to make it as an affiliate without a blog, e.g., content strategy. You don’t necessarily need to ‘blog’, but you would need to continually add new content – whether it be evergreen content, product pages with detailed descriptions, etc. WA basically attempts to show you how to manage a WordPress site, how to get it ranked and options for monetizing it.

In most blogs I usually skip the post to the end. But your post is one in a million, so I read it from start to finish. I was a member of Wealthy Aff (2007 – 2010, then 2013 -2014). 110% agree with you. It seems that not just the sales letter but thousands of WA members are over praising WA all over the internet, like it will make people money 100% guarantee, while in most cases that just isn’t true. The main method is SEO and thanks to G Panda and Penguin getting ranking takes months and even more time to produce first sale. While it is a good place for beginners, since they walk you through steps like WordPress and important SEO techniques, but it will take time, perhaps years to see result. Which is a problem since WA charges monthly for their training. New members could spend over $500 on WA membership before seeing their first check. Also, I agree with you with the WA Bootcamp part. It misled newbies to promoting back WA while they still fail to make the money. I tried promoting WA myself and it was very hard to make even one sale and even worse, that referral only stayed for 3 months and then cancel his membership. That time I already have experience and made money in other niches. Despite all that, over 100,000++ websites on the internet a promoting WA, especially review sites like onemorecupof-coffee. Those review sites kept bashing other legitimate products like Bring The Fresh and recommending the readers to go for WA instead.

Focus on reviewing products and services that fall within your niche. Then, leveraging the rapport you have created with your audience and your stance as an expert, tell your readers why they would benefit from purchasing the product or service you are promoting. Almost anything sold online can be reviewed if there is an affiliate program – you can review physical products, digital software, or even services booked online, like ride sharing or travel resort booking. It is especially effective to compare this product to others in the same category. Most importantly, make sure you are generating detailed, articulate content to improve conversions.


One thing I didn’t like is that they give no guidance as to what constitutes a good niche. They imply, if they don’t say it outright, that you can make money out of any niche, you just have to choose one you’re passionate about and money will necessarily follow. I wholeheartedly disagree. Let’s take an example. If I’m passionate about, say, jigsaw puzzles, does that make them a good niche? Sure, there are such products sold on the net and probably you can earn commissions from them, but 1) this is the sort of things people will more likely buy at brick and mortar stores, 2) most of them are not expensive enough to make significant commissions from them, and 3) most importantly, if, as they say, you must first give value and help people, how can you write tens of posts that will “help” people about jigsaw puzzles? I for one would run out of ideas before having used all fingers of one hand. And that’s also why I disagree with their suggestion to select very narrow niches. One can only write so much about so little.
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