Buy and sell domain names. If you’re good at finding popular yet undiscovered domain names, you can make some cash on the side by buying and reselling websites. Think of it as digital real estate speculation. Domains are available on GoDaddy.com for as little as $2.99 per year, but are sometimes resold at far higher prices: According to Business Insider, the site MM.com sold for $1.2 million dollars in 2014. Once you find the perfect domain name to resell, you can market it on Flippa.com for a flat fee.

It depends on where you live. Many public places will require you to have a permit for sales. However, in a nice, family-friendly neighborhood as a kid, it would likely be fine. If you plan on selling street-crafts for a living, find out what the local regulations are and look into the costs of a stall, half shipping container or other form of suitable "pop-up shop" because you will be out there in all sorts of weather and you'll need to protect the crafts.
I remember I use to be a free member but once I saw Kyles own website that compares Swagbucks to Wealthy Affiliate then I knew it was B.S… Comparing a reward site to a “training” site is ridiculous.. Not to mention all the hundreds of fake sites that pretend to review other sites that are in competition with wealthy affiliate and give them bad scores and put wealth affiliate as #1… All the information that they give on their crap website is free on the internet if you know where to look.
Ask for a raise. If you’re unhappy with your compensation at your 9-5 job, asking for a raise is one way to beef up your bank account. Most employers offer an annual review of your work – which could be the perfect time to negotiate a higher salary or ask for better perks. If your employer doesn’t offer such an opportunity, it might be time to initiate a review yourself.
Once you've protected your prospecting pool, maximize your affiliate program by working with the best and leaving the rest. As the old 80/20 adage implies, most of your revenue will come from a very small percentage of your affiliates. Because it can be time-consuming to manage a larger affiliate network, consider selecting only a few companies initially, and interview them before signing them on. Affiliates are an extension of your sales force and represent your online brand, so choose partners carefully.
I agree with EVERY WORD you say here. Having been a member of WA who was acttively trying to mentor new members I discovered that WA mentorship actually does not exist. Not one person who I asked at WA knew who their mentor was, let alone got ANY help from them. Whenever I contacted my up line mentor the reply I always got was the standard reply as above.
Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
The support in there is really hit and miss, which can be a bummer, as the quality of response you receive can vary greatly depending upon who replies, and it’s seldom you’ll get much from either of the head muckity mucks. They profess to be active in the community chat, but often times it’s a lot of “hey, great job…keep up the good work and you’ll be making money in no time” kind of fluff. Be prepared to do some Googling when you have a question.
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