You should also make sure you aren't competing with your own affiliates for eyeballs. Any marketing channels you're using, such as search engines, content sites or e-mail lists, should be off limits to your affiliates. Put marketing restrictions into your affiliate agreement and notify partners immediately. It's your program--you set the rules. Or, if you prefer, you can let your affiliates run the majority of your internet marketing.
Affilorama – While I promoted Affilorama in the past, I no longer do for many reasons. It has simply become too outdated. Affilorama also lacks in some of the training. Instead, they focus on helping you get started quickly by designing a site for you and seeding it with content. Some of the optional training courses they sell are quite expensive and compares to an entire annual membership at Wealthy Affiliate, so that’s why I no longer promote them. Again, they are worth checking out, but I think Wealthy Affiliate is a much better buy.
Individual sellers and companies offering products or services have to deal with their consumers and ensure they are satisfied with what they have purchased. Thanks to the affiliate marketing structure, you’ll never have to be concerned with customer support or customer satisfaction. The entire job of the affiliate marketer is to link the seller with the consumer. The seller deals with any consumer complaints after you receive your commission from the sale.
Anyone who knows how to search for things on Google can uncover more useful information, and in less time, than interacting with the WA support community, which means the only useful things you have access to are the training vids which are passable, but not fantastic. The other selling point with going premium is the higher referral fee, but what good is that if you only sell a handful of WA memberships per year?
Anyway, I’m thankful that I didn’t spend too much time on creating sites there and that I didn’t put any significant content before deciding to leave. I will now peruse some free training and then try two courses that are a bit pricey but seem more useful, The Authority Site System (from the Authority Hacker site), and SEO Affiliate Domination. I’m just starting to read the SEO Affiliate Domination free crash course, and as far as Authority Hacker is concerned, I can say that I got far more useful information in their free webinar alone that in all five WA courses combined. I first learned about these courses on Jeremy Harrison’s Hustle Life site. (He also says that WA is good but not great.) If anyone has tried the two aforementioned courses, I’d like to hear about it.
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned.
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