What a fantastic package! I wish I’d found Wealthy Affiliates years ago. I couldn’t believe that they have been around for so long! With the training and support that they offer for the price they are asking, how can I possibly fail! Well, I suppose not taking action would be a big one. Thanks for putting together a very informative article. Great work!
There is no shortage of products you’ll be able to promote. You’ll have the ability to pick and choose products that you personally believe in, so make sure that your campaigns center around truly valuable products that consumers will enjoy. You’ll achieve an impressive conversion rate while simultaneously establishing the reliability of your personal brand. 

Now I imagine there are some highly motivated and disciplined individuals who could utilize the membership training and community resource to build a profitable businesses; however… The main sales page is a bit misleading in that I feel it grossly oversimplifies the process of establishing a profitable site, and it nowhere near emphasizes just how much work will be involved. Not to mention, the several months you will have to devote to this before you start seeing any sort of income.
Not to mentioned the support you can get from experts, the 10,000’s of conversations that you can take part in, and a great deal of training to get you rolling with your business. It is going to get you rolling, and of course, if you want to take your business more seriously and access the key to the community, there is the Premium membership there for that. But you decide. We can assure you that the Starter membership (which is free) is better than anything else in the industry…let alone the Premium service.
This is a very polished and well made plugin – everything operates exactly as it should, easy to configure with a good amount of customization options. The resulting output looks good and should fit in well with any theme you choose to use – having the option to tweak it with some custom CSS is a bonus if something is not displaying quite right for you. Including Amazon links in your posts can be quite lucrative, I personally have earned a lot of money from the Associates program – if you have a website or blog which talks about products quite often, using this plugin can add an extra later of monetization to your site. I found that over Christmas and Black friday sales go through the roof so by using this plugin you should be able to make some extra money which in turn will pay for the plugin cost. I found the plugin developer friendly and helpful in the course of reviewing this plugin so you will be in good hands if you ever require any support.
On MunchEye you can take a peak at the JV pages for these products, and on those pages they often show what the upsell funnel looks like. Some of them are utterly ridiculous, like you pay £4.99 for the front end product but there are £500 worth of upsells. And this is how affiliates are able to make so much money from these launches, because people get tricked into all these upsells.
ClickBank allows you to join for free, and the approval process is virtually automatic, so it’s a great choice for people entering the affiliated game for the first time. ClickBank has a ton of information, including FAQs, walk-throughs, and videos available, so the barrier to entry is quite low. There’s also a (paid) program called ClickBank University with courses and assistance from experienced marketers.
Well I couldn’t have put it better myself! I joined as a free member several months ago and fortunately didn’t get brainwashed into going premium. The “community” is full of hopefuls who just part with their money which they probably get from a regular job. They are all under the impression that the founders of WA are some kind of gods or heroes. I have been robbed off by one of them with a lame reply which told me they don’t use cpanel because it’s outdated and their platform is state of the art. I didn’t even bother to ask why as I suspected it was just an excuse.
I also started an e-commerce retail site that I went with another company on and it ended up costing me thousands of dollars, held all the so-called training over the phone for 30 minutes that they rushed through, the only writing training instructions were very generic and general in terms. I am still with them since I had a year. I have 4 months to go and can’t wait to move my DNS over to WA! It is difficult to get questions answered and have to wait until whenever they got around to returning a call. They complete the basic website framework for you and it looks like someone still learning to be a designer did it! I paid monthly for hosting, which alone is as much as WA’s fee for everything, paid separate for social media marketing training, which was next to nothing. In general their training platform was the pits!
You're going to be doing product reviews and recommendations, so pick a topic that you enjoy and about which you can demonstrate some expertise. Choose a narrow enough niche to be distinctive—for example, bands from your city, left-handed guitarists, music for a certain kind of dancing, authors of a certain religion, books about business, or arts and crafts resources. If you can't stay passionate about the topic, that will show.
As far as using WA as a registrar and web host, that is not advisable. As the old saying goes, you never want to have all of your eggs in one basket, and it’s extremely important that you retain complete control over all of the moving parts involved with running an online business, i.e., hosting, domain, dns, email, etc. WA’s hosting services are very canned and restrictive – negating a lot of the flexibility and extensibility which is the beauty of WordPress. As a beginner, you may not recognize these limitations early on, but if you begin to succeed and start looking at ways to improve your online presence, you will undoubtedly realize that WA’s hosting services are less-than-mediocre. Those who are using WA’s hosting and are running successful sites are members who’ve been online for probably 6-8 yrs or more and are deeply indexed.
Hi, Jamie! Very good list. I needed something like this for 2018 so that I know what to target in the future blogs I create. As for now, I’m comfortable using SiteGround affiliate network and it’s pretty good actually. Their hosting service is pretty much the best considered its price. I’ve tried others but SiteGround stands out. I’ll also try new affiliate networks, something from the list you have just provided. I think Amazon is too saturated at the moment, and I need a better network. 2018 will be interesting indeed.
I then stumbled across WA, and thought hey maybe I’ll do this. But it seems to me that it might be better simply just to set up a wordpress blog and go from there. If I do want to start IM I can learn SEO all over the net. I saw that on WA you have to be a premium member to get comments on your wordpress sites however I am very sure if I set up my own WP blog I can get a plugin of some sort to have comments.
Affiliates discussed the issues in Internet forums and began to organize their efforts. They believed that the best way to address the problem was to discourage merchants from advertising via adware. Merchants that were either indifferent to or supportive of adware were exposed by affiliates, thus damaging those merchants' reputations and tarnishing their affiliate marketing efforts. Many affiliates either terminated the use of such merchants or switched to a competitor's affiliate program. Eventually, affiliate networks were also forced by merchants and affiliates to take a stand and ban certain adware publishers from their network. The result was Code of Conduct by Commission Junction/beFree and Performics,[35] LinkShare's Anti-Predatory Advertising Addendum,[36] and ShareASale's complete ban of software applications as a medium for affiliates to promote advertiser offers.[37] Regardless of the progress made, adware continues to be an issue, as demonstrated by the class action lawsuit against ValueClick and its daughter company Commission Junction filed on April 20, 2007.[38]
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned. 
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