You also should not join Wealthy Affiliate if you don’t enjoy the community / social aspect of it. A huge part of Wealthy Affiliate is the ability to communicate with other members. It’s a “help and be helped” community. If you have no interest in setting up your profile, asking questions, supporting others, chatting in the live chat sessions, or doing any sort of participation, you will not get the full benefit of the service.


I have been with WA since last August and It ha been a really nice leaning experience. The live training is really amazing and it is always up to date on what is going on in the industries. I also love the features that you can write a post in the community and someone that has more experience can stop by and answer your question (god knows I have so many lol 😅) I am happy with the sevice 😀 Great review.

StudioPress itself is somewhat of a niche product as it is targeted to existing WordPress users who found setting up and managing a WordPress site too difficult or time-consuming. StudioPress prides itself on being easy to use, but their main claim to fame is that their hosted websites are “faster and more secure” than other WordPress hosting companies as well as using the “Genesis framework” which is supposedly more SEO friendly than other WordPress builds.
Great advice here. The typical idea of writing reviews of bicycle pedals and expecting someone to follow your link in order to buy a pair is dead. Now if you are actually a cyclists, and you know something about all the different types of pedals, and why different types solve different cycling problems, then hey, welcome to the world of providing useful content.
Established in 1997, FOREX CLUB (the company) is the brand name for a group of companies that provides clients from over 120 countries with platforms and services for trading forex, CFDs and other online trading and educational products. We offer every client effective tools in training, analytics and education, as well as personal support where they want it. FOREX CLUB has over 650 employees worldwide.  In 2011 alone, over 45,000 traders chose to learn forex trading with us.  FOREX CLUB was one of the industry’s first to offer zero spread trading and commission refunds on all unprofitable trades.
Note: I think the line where readers will push back probably will vary from blog to blog depending upon their readership. For example here on ProBlogger I get a little more negative feedback from readers on affiliate promotions. I suspect ProBlogger readers are a little more tuned into the issue and suspicious of some of the affiliate marketing that goes on around the web.

I started a blog which I plan to monetize only through affiliate marketing and my own products, no ads. I’ve been working on building an audience for my blog, for about 1 year and a half, many people think is maybe too much time, but I just want to make sure that I build enough trust with my readers before I start to try to make them buy something.

I achieved what I set out to do and found out that Wealthy Affiliate have not published any cancellation policy other than a couple of lines in the “terms and conditions” A bit poor if you ask me, I would have thought it was a legal requirement with such a company. Additionally there is no refund policy as far as I know either. I’m sure they haven’t overlooked this due to their past experiences with the legal system.


Leadpages claims that its affiliate program is not exclusively for affiliate marketers, which is true, but the narrow focus of this niche means that only professionals affiliate marketers will ever be able to earn significant income from the program. Leadpages’s affiliate program does offer quite a lot of different options (webinars, videos, blog posts, free marketing courses, etc.) to send referrals to, which can lead to higher conversion rates if done correctly.
The entire reason I created this site is because as an affiliate marketer, I started getting upset with the lack of ethics and misinformation being spread from MANY affiliate marketers, especially as it pertains to the “make money online” niche. So many online marketers out there promise you quick easy money if you just sign up and pay for this or that. Quite frankly, I’m sick of it. Growing an affiliate marketing business is just like starting any other business – it takes time, effort, and a lot of trial and error. I won’t get into it here, but if you’d like you can read my honest article about how long it takes to earn a full-time living with affiliate marketing.

The key is to first validate your niche by looking at search trends, analyzing the competition and making sure it’s something that can be monetized. Once you’ve got that, start building it out and producing great content. Focus on nothing but the rankings for at least 6-12 months. During this time I would advise putting nothing on the site except for maybe a simple adsense ad. Adsense is not a profitable way to go per se, but it’s an easy way to get started, plus Google must continually sniff your site in order to serve up relevant ads. Site visitors generally find adsense to be less invasive since the ads shown to them are usually relevant anyway.

I remember I use to be a free member but once I saw Kyles own website that compares Swagbucks to Wealthy Affiliate then I knew it was B.S… Comparing a reward site to a “training” site is ridiculous.. Not to mention all the hundreds of fake sites that pretend to review other sites that are in competition with wealthy affiliate and give them bad scores and put wealth affiliate as #1… All the information that they give on their crap website is free on the internet if you know where to look.


Affiliate marketing overlaps with other Internet marketing methods to some degree, because affiliates often use regular advertising methods. Those methods include organic search engine optimization (SEO), paid search engine marketing (PPC – Pay Per Click), e-mail marketing, content marketing, and (in some sense) display advertising. On the other hand, affiliates sometimes use less orthodox techniques, such as publishing reviews of products or services offered by a partner.[citation needed]
Is this because WP is now blocking outside adds on free accounts? WP recent advised users that ads may appear on free accounts. I saw that WP has a plugin just for Amazon posts, but any plugin requires a business account. In looking at the pay-to-play WP account details, it looks like one has to buy the second level account in order to “monetize your website”. 

Recent corporate changes and folding 2Checkout into a larger company that is involved in payment processing and e-commerce means that the affiliate program can sometimes feel somewhat neglected. But the ability to generate custom coupon codes and the comprehensive knowledge base make 2Checkout a good option for experienced affiliates with an established user base. But if you’re just entering the affiliate field for the first time, 2Checkout might not be where you want to start.

It is my opinion you may be discounting the significance of your background and assuming others, with no idea as to how to even start such a journey, would easily know how to begin. So, to me, WA jumps into the fray rescuing the neophyte, is it perfect? Nope, but they are highly successful in laying an effective foundation on which further study can be obtained. From my perspective, for their concerted effort, I give them a resounding applause!!!
Promoting WA is a tired and oversaturated niche. They have funneled users into this niche to further their own SEO and to turn their customers into their marketing team, but I believe WA’s best days are far behind them. The lessons they provide are alright, but the tools they give you to work with are pretty bad. For example, there is no way you can use their hosting platform and WordPress installer to set up a successful site. There may be sites which are doing well on their platform, but they were built 6-8 years ago and are well indexed by now. Removing this from the equation significantly lessens the value of their membership.
I had a niche I was passionate about for one of my websites & the other was through boot camp (which focuses on promotion of WA). I was on the WA every day for months putting in work. When I took a break, what I described in my previous comment, had happened. What if I hadn’t backed my work up? It would have been lost. I do not want somebody else to experience this.
There are probably hundreds of these blogs floating around, and some of them rank quite well. I guess one could give WA props for teaching some decent SEO techniques, but that seems to be about it. I find the “bait and switch” review tactic particularly nauseating. It’s quite obvious that most of these negative reviews are nothing more than “cookie cutter” posts, and that the “reviewer” hasn’t even personally gone through the product they are bashing. Anybody that writes reviews about products they don’t have themselves and know nothing about is a fraud as far as I’m concerned. 
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